Tag Archives: hypnosis

Factors which affect hypnotisability

What is the difference between hypnosis and hypnotherapy?

 

The difference between hypnosis and hypnotherapy are commonly confused concept. This is especially true when hew to the subject , so here is difference between hypnosis and hypnotherapy ?

Hypnosis

Hypnosis is a state in which the hypnotic subject is focused on an idea, thought or physical space. This focus is sufficient that they have a reduced awareness and become more open to suggestion. There are three main uses for hypnosis.

  1. Hypnosis is used for entertainment, as with stage hypnosis. In stage hypnosis usually only the most responsive subjects are used. This shows off the power of hypnosis to its full extent. However, it is not innately beneficial to the subject.
  2. Hypnosis is also used to recover memory in legal cases. this practice is called Forensic hypnosis.  The quality of the memories recovered are treated with great suspicion by the legal world. The reason for this suspicion is that memory can easily be altered, even by accident. This creates what is known as a false memory.
  3. For therapeutic benefit, also known as hypnotherapy.
Hypnotherapy

hypnotherapy is the use of the powerful state of hypnosis to create beneficial change. Typically, this may involve suggestions or imagery which will help the subject to achieve their desired change. Hypnotherapy is used around the world to help people ;

  • Break habits and change behaviours.
  • Reduce nerves anxiety.
  • Cope with physical and emotional pain.
  • Improve their performance.
  • Many other issues and problems.

The important thing to remember is that hypnotherapy is used specifically with the intention of helping the subject in some way.

 

 

difference between hypnosis and hypnotherapy

 

Author – Matt Krouwel is a  hypnotherapist in Birmingham (UK). He is also the course leader for the West Midlands  School of Clinical Hypnotherapy  

 

Factors which affect hypnotisability

How to become a certified hypnotherapist – Top 5 things to consider

How to become a certified hypnotherapist

So you want to know how to become a certified hypnotherapist? This Blog will tell you everything you need to know to go from the desire to  become a hypnotherapist right up to being able to see clients. 

Training to become a hypnotherapist

A hypnotherapists is only as good as their training. Here are 5 of the top things to be on the look out for when choosing a training course.

  1. How much classroom time? – Hypnotherapy is a practical skill and requires supervised classroom time to  practice. Most courses won’t allow you to pass with anything less than 100+ hours of contact time.  Anything less than this should make you suspicious.
  2. Is there any 1-2-1 or small group time? – Small groups and 1-2-1’s can be essential in preventing your learning needs from becoming lost. A good course will offer this, often with external tutors.
  3. What accreditation does the course have? – In the UK you should be looking for a statement of formal academic level (usually 3 or 4).  Be careful; terms such as ‘Certificate’ can be deceptive as they may mean an in-house qualifications with no external validation.
  4. Is the course associated with a professional body? – Professional bodies exist to maintain standards after you have qualified. They deal with ongoing issues of Continuous Professional Development (CPD), ethics and legislative changes  and professional conduct. If there isn’t a professional body associated with the training course then be very wary. Even if there is, some of these are attached to one school only and have little real value.   In the UK Professional bodies should also be accredited with the Complimentary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNCH).
  5. Insurance? – Most professional bodies will be able to direct you to an insurer, such as www.holisticinsurance.co.uk. Insurance is important to protect you professionally.   Although it is not often mentioned on websites a training provider should be able to tell you a little about insurance for the industry.

 

how to become a certified hypnotherapist

 

Matt Krouwel is the course leader for the West Midlands School of Clinical Hypnotherapy and has 14 years experience as a hypnotherapy teacher both in the UK and abroad . He also researches hypnotherapy for Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at the University of Birmingham.

Factors which affect hypnotisability

Some lessons in hypnosis for CAMMRA

Lessons in hypnosis for the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Midlands Research Alliance (CAMMRA)

Today I’m off to the annual CAMMRA conference to give some hypnosis lessons and talk about the general public’s attitude towards hypnotherapy.

I had the privilege to be an invited guest at last years conference and this year I’m back to present. If last year is anything to go by I can expect a varied and open minded audience of complimentary and alternative therapists (CAM),  academics and medical researchers for my hypnosis lessons.

The main thrust of my talk is around the research I’ve been conducting into public attitudes and opinions regarding hypnosis. Sadly I’m currently unable to blog on this particular topic at the moment due to an agreement with the journal which is looking to publish it, but once it’s out I will let everyone know my findings.

Find out more about hypnosis lessons

Hope you have a great day!

hypnosis lessons

Author – Matt Krouwel is a Birmingham based Clinical hypnotist and course leader for the West Midlands School of Clinical Hypnosis

 

2016 a good year for pain!

2016 has only been here for a few weeks and the evidence for hypnotherapy as a tool to aid with pain abounds.

First we have to thank Kendrick et al for reviewing 25 randomised control trials (RTC’s) of hypnotic pain control for acute procedural pain. They found that hypnosis is at least as good as other psychological or behavioural pain control approaches and was especially good;

  • When sessions could be done in advance of the procedure.
  • For minor surgical procedures.

A meta-analysis of Iranian hypnosis studies (Sayehmiri, ) further confirms its efficacy with evidence from studies totalling 332 patients being combined.

Additionally we have new research from Ardigo et al into chronic pain in the elder, in which 3 x 30 minute hypnotherapeutic pain control sessions out performed an equivalent amount of massage as an analgesic for 53 geriatric patients (27 received hypno, 27 massage). Notably it appears that the hypnosis group benefited from pain reduction for longer.

We also have Del Casale et al publishing a meta-analysis of hypnosis neuro-imaging studies… which is nice and I’m sure people with better neuroanatomy than me will love it.

A big ‘Well done!’ to all those who are moving the evidence base forward in 2016!

Matt Krouwel DBSCH

West Midlands School of Clinical Hypnotherapy

Matt Krouwel – Hypnotherapy

References

Ardigo, S., Herrmann, F. R., Moret, V., Déramé, L., Giannelli, S., Gold, G., & Pautex, S. (2016). Hypnosis can reduce pain in hospitalized older patients: a randomized controlled study. BMC geriatrics, 16(1), 1.

Del Casale, A., Ferracuti, S., Rapinesi, C., De Rossi, P., Angeletti, G., Sani, G., … & Girardi, P. (2016). Hypnosis and pain perception: An Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies. Journal of Physiology-Paris.

Kendrick, C., Sliwinski, J., Yu, Y., Johnson, A., Fisher, W., Kekecs, Z., & Elkins, G. (2016). Hypnosis for Acute Procedural Pain: A Critical Review. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 64(1), 75-115.

Sayehmiri, K. (2016). Determining the Effectiveness of Hypnosis in the Treatment of Pain and Enhancing Mental Performance in Iran Using Meta-Analysis. International Journal of Epidemiologic Research.